ungloom (y)our heart balloon with this chewy amalgam of semiotic bubblegum

November 5, 2012 4:15 pm

"I find no catharsis…This is not a psychological enterprise for me, it is a calling. And anyone who knows a calling, it is a terrible, terrible thing. Because it is something you did not choose…It’s not some vainglorious shit, it’s what it is. It’s pretty mundane, to have a calling. You gotta get up every day and fucking do bullshit. So whether it’s transcendent or it’s kind of this oh-woe-is-me crap, the end of it is it’s the daily grind. But certainly what I find is that I happen to be very good at something that I find incredibly difficult. And I think that there are plenty of artists out there, who are incredibly good at shit they find very difficult. And if you don’t have any compassion for yourself, because most of the artists that we have now are artists who are very good at something they find very easy. What we need are more of these artists who find what they do very difficult—because it’s the process of that compassion or forgiving yourself that is difficult that creates some of the most glorious art, you know? But you write very little. I’m super slow. So it’s more like the daily grind, and the constant reminder that it’s okay. I mean I wake up every day and it’s like it is okay, that at this thing which I am good at, I’m very terrible at. How do you deal with your fear, your blockages, the way you resist yourself, in the process of creating art, how do you deal with it?

I have one limited experience from one subjectivity, so I can not pretend that anything I say about this is in any way authoritative.You know when anyone talks about art, it’s simply a heuristic, something that you bounce off of and perhaps it can produce learning, perhaps it doesn’t. My sense of it has been from my own experience, again very very tiny, very particular. My sense of it has always been that what defines an artist’s success, is not their training and their persistence, both necessary.Training and persistence, both necessary. But what defines an artist’s success is usually their compassion. And compassion starts at home. Most of us hobble ourself in our art because we have such limited compassion and it’s no accident, we live in a society that teaches us no compassion. And so we have no compassion for ourselves. And therefore every time we try to do something, first we take a bat, smash ourselves in the face, and then say sing. Or write. Or dance. In fact, I always think, develop your compassion, and your art follows. And it’s a very difficult struggle. It’s a very difficult struggle; I think that a lot of the professionalization of arts wants to render this myth that training and persistence are enough but the truth of it is, a person who forgives themselves with no training, will outwrite the greatest writer on earth. To forgive yourself for your limitations, to forgive yourself for your fragility, to forgive yourself for your mistakes, I mean, we’re not taught that. I wasn’t taught that—I come from a military family. A military, Dominican, fucking family. My father was a full out, card-carrying member of the Trujilato. You know? No I’m like, to the left of super progressive, but my dad was a straight-up fascist. And that’s just the way it is, it happens. And there was no forgiveness in a military family, you know? For me, it’s the endless struggle, because it’s like alcoholism, you don’t suddenly become compassionate to yourself, you do it every day. There is no achieving it. There’s no achieving it, you just struggle every day. I still remember in my family, again, this was good for one day, and terrible for another way—in my family, we never had that American thing, you know that American thing where nobody’s to blame. You know, my students, I love my students to death, I really do, I love my students to death but I don’t speak the language of excuse. So I always have to sit there and be like, ‘Oh wait, they’re trying to tell me an excuse!’ Cause I don’t even know, I don’t even know what the fuck it is. I was like ‘Oh shit! This is an excuse, dude!’ ‘Cause in my family, there was none of that. If a bottle fell, the closest person next to it would be like ‘I did that, I am responsible for that.’ And that was it. Which is a fucking terrible way to grow up. Because sometimes shit happens and there’s nobody to blame. And sometimes, the first reaction shouldn’t be blame, it should be forgiveness. And I think whether you lived in a more explicit version of that Dominican culture like my father or a less explicit, most of us live in that regime, a regime of no-forgiveness.”

July 17, 2011 12:27 pm
ronbabcock:

mindbabies:

nirak:

“Think Bigger: 3 billion dollar theft gets man 40 months, 100 dollar theft gets another 15 years.” - @JPBarlow
Once again from ross’s twitter.



unsurprising yet unfathomable

ronbabcock:

mindbabies:

nirak:

“Think Bigger: 3 billion dollar theft gets man 40 months, 100 dollar theft gets another 15 years.” - @JPBarlow

Once again from ross’s twitter.

unsurprising yet unfathomable

(via steveagee)

April 27, 2011 1:42 pm

"Money can’t buy you love - or social skills"

"In three studies, lower-class individuals (compared with upper-class individuals) received higher scores on a test of empathic accuracy (Study 1), judged the emotions of an interaction partner more accurately (Study 2), and made more accurate inferences about emotion from static images of muscle movements in the eyes (Study 3). Moreover, the association between social class and empathic accuracy was explained by the tendency for lower-class individuals to explain social events in terms of features of the external environment."

- Social Class, Contextualism, and Empathic Accuracy  //  Psychological Science

_______+++++__________++++___________++++_________+++++______

"But what if people who are financially well-off get that way because they’re more self-focused? What if wealth doesn’t affect empathy, but empathy affects wealth? To find out, the researchers recruited 81 different students. This time, they asked some of the students to visualize an extraordinarily wealthy individual — someone like Bill Gates, Kraus said.

Next, the students were told to place themselves on the socioeconomic ladder, imagining their wealthy individual at the top. Thinking of the Gates-like figure triggered the students to place themselves lower on the ladder than they otherwise would have. Other students were told to imagine someone completely destitute; those students placed themselves relatively higher on the ladder.

Finally, the 81 students looked at 36 close-up photographs of eyes and judged the emotions portrayed in the pictures. Sure enough, those manipulated into seeing themselves as lower-class scored 6 percent better than those manipulated into perceiving themselves as well-off.

That was a critical finding, Kraus said.

"If you manipulate, then you can talk about class leading to empathy," he said.

research by Michael Kraus @ UCSF, article by Stephanie Papas

thought I’d already posted this but I guess not. Also this affiliated blog Psych Your Mind is neat.

March 28, 2010 11:54 pm
"The virtual invisibility that whiteness affords those of us who have it is like psychological money in the bank, the proceeds of which we cash in every day while others are in a state of perpetual overdraft…In California, since 1980, nearly 30 new prisons have opened, compared to two four-year colleges, with the effect that the space available for people of color and whites to receive a good education has been curtailed. So folks fight over the pieces of a diminishing pie—as with Proposition 209 to end affirmative action—instead of uniting against their common problem: the mostly white lawmakers who prioritize jails and slashing taxes on the wealthy over meeting the needs of most people."

from “Thoughts on Acknowledging and Challenging Whiteness” - Tim Wise, white antiracist activist/writer
September 21, 2009 12:59 pm
Evidence of Mr Raju’s success could clearly be seen on 30 August, when he organised 300,000 villagers from over 7,500 villages in northern Bihar to engage in a mass tree planting ceremony. In doing so the agriculture graduate from Bangalore has provided “sustainable employment” to people living below the poverty line in Bihar.

Evidence of Mr Raju’s success could clearly be seen on 30 August, when he organised 300,000 villagers from over 7,500 villages in northern Bihar to engage in a mass tree planting ceremony. In doing so the agriculture graduate from Bangalore has provided “sustainable employment” to people living below the poverty line in Bihar.